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0 Education and Training - Ayurvedic

 1.5 Education and Training 

At present, more than 190 undergraduate Ayurvedic colleges in India offer a curriculum for a Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS) degree. This program takes 5 1/2 years to complete and runs according to the standards of the Central Council of Indian Medicine (CCIM), which is a statutory body that regulates the ISM education in the country. During the 5 1/2 years of education, the student must go through internship for a period of 1 year. The 10 + 2 (10 years of school education followed by 2 years of predegree study) students with Science Group are eligible to take admissions in the degree course. This is similar to the requirement for the admission to the MBBS (allopathy) degree program. In fact, in many states there is a common entrance test to admit candidates to these courses. BAMS contains many modern subjects in its course material; however, nothing is taught in MBBS colleges about Ayurveda or any other ISM. This is a paradox, as many modern medicine graduates prescribe Ayurvedic drugs — especially in difficult- to-cure diseases like hepatitis — without any training in Ayurveda. The Department of ISM, being perceptive of this situation, has prepared course material containing basic concepts and fundamentals of ISM & H for incorporation in MBBS curricula. This has been forwarded to the Medical Council of India for appropriate action. In most states, e.g., Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Gujarat, Ayurvedic colleges are state supported. 

Because it is necessary that Ayurvedic graduates understand modern advances in medical diagnostic methods, medical technology, and drug treatment, the present curriculum contains about 50% conventional medicine, and clinical and preclinical subjects. The CCIM, which is the apex body in matters related to the education and practice of Ayurveda in the country, is initiating steps to revise the curriculum to suit the present-day requirement by placing emphasis on practical-oriented teaching. Furthermore, at present there is no facility to impart training in some of the important disciplines, like Vriksha Ayurveda (a subdivision of Ayurveda that deals with matters related to cultivation of plants) and Pasu Ayurveda (Ayurvedic veterinary science), at the undergraduate level. Steps have to be initiated to include them as subjects for study at the undergraduate level. 

Soure: Lakshmi chandra Mishra, scientific Basis for Ayurvedic Therapies; 2004 by CRC Press LLC


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0 Grey Saltbush (Atriplex cinerea)

Grey Saltbush (Atriplex cinerea)

Saltbush attracts native butterflies and is a caterpillar food plant. Salty tasting, its leaves can be eaten and are high in protein. Saltbush leaves work well added to stir fries or used to stuff lamb or chicken and can also be roasted in the oven and used as a crunchy garnish. Saltbush can also be used as a salt substitute. European colonists called this plant ‘sea sage’ and blanched leaves, which were eaten as a vegetable. The leaves can also be burnt to create soap. Many diverse Aboriginal groups use Saltbush to flavour food and Saltbush seeds are also ground to make damper.

Soure: Indigenous plant use; A booklet on the medicinal, nutritional and technological use of indigenous plants; By Zena Cumpston; Clean Air and Urban Landscapes (CAUL) Hub in Melbourne 2020 

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0 Academic Role of Ayurveda in Future Health Care

1.4 Academic Role of Ayurveda in Future Health Care 

The concepts of proper lifestyles, dietary habits, and daily and seasonal routines followed in Ayurveda can be adopted with suitable modification to different countries in different 

TABLE 1.2 

Number of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Colleges and Institutions In India (1 April 1999) 

Number of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Colleges and Institutions In India

parts of the globe after giving due consideration to the cultural milieu existing in each country and also the constitutional profile of each population. Attempts can also be made to utilize the medicinal plant resources of these countries for meeting the health-care needs of their people after categorization of the plants according to Ayurvedic concepts. Drugs used in ISM can be used as adjuvant to the main drugs used in conventional medicine. Therapeutic approaches such as Panchakarma, Ksarasutra, etc. can certainly be integrated into other health systems, broadening the choices available to physicians and patients. 

Soure: Lakshmi chandra Mishra, scientific Basis for Ayurvedic Therapies; 2004 by CRC Press LLC

 

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0 Bulbophyllum apiferum Carr-The Bee Carrying Bulbophyllum

 Bulbophyllum apiferum Carr, Gard. Bull. Straits Settlem. 5: 133 (1930).

Bulbophyllum apiferum
Bulbophyllum apiferum
Bulbophyllum apiferum

Bulbophyllum apiferum Carr; Photos Nghiem Xuan Son

Vietnamese name: Lọng tổ ong 

Chinise name

Common Name: The Bee Carrying Bulbophyllum 

Latin Name: Bulbophyllum apiferum Carr

Family: Orchidaceae

Synonym Name: Bulbophyllum holttumii A.D.Hawkes

Description: As a small sized, warm to cool growing epiphyte with close set, ovoid pseudobulbs carrying a single, apical, erect, stiff, apically rounded and very shortly pointed leaf that basally narrows into a petiole and blooms in the winter and spring on a slender, erect, then drooping at an obtuse angle, 15 cm long inflorescence with 14 flowers in a tight apical cluster.

Distribution: Found in Laos, Thailand Malaysia and VietNam. 

Ecological: Primary humid, evergreen, broad-leaved, mixed and coniferous forests on limestone and shale at elevations of 800 to 1500 m.

Reference

- theplantlist.org

- efloras.org

- orchidspecies.com

- ipni.org

- Ong, P.T., O'Byrne, P., Saw, L.G. & Chung, R.C.K. (2017). Checklist of orchids of Peninsular Malaysia Research pamphlet, Forest Research Institute, Federation of Malaya 136: 1-169.

- Averyanov, L.V. & al. (2015). New orchids in the flora of Vietnam Wulfenia 22: 137-188.

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0 Bulbophyllum khasyanum Griff.-The Khasia Hills Bulbophyllum

Bulbophyllum khasyanum Griff., Not. Pl. Asiat. 3: 284 (1851).

Bulbophyllum khasyanum
Bulbophyllum khasyanum
Bulbophyllum khasyanum
Bulbophyllum khasyanum
Bulbophyllum khasyanum
Bulbophyllum khasyanum
Bulbophyllum khasyanum Griff.; Photos Nghiem Xuan Son
Vietnamese name: Cầu diệp Khasya (PHH), Lọng ấn (TH).
Chinise name: 卷苞石豆兰 juan bao shi dou lan 
Common Name: The Khasia Hills Bulbophyllum (refers to an area of NE India)
Latin Name: Bulbophyllum khasyanum Griff.
Family: Orchidaceae
Synonym Name: Bulbophyllum bowringianum Rchb.f.; Bulbophyllum conchiferum Rchb.f.; Bulbophyllum cylindraceum var. khasyanum (Griff.) Hook.f.; Bulbophyllum gibsonii Lindl. ex Rchb.f.; Phyllorchis conchifera (Rchb. f.) Kuntze; Phyllorkis conchifera (Rchb.f.) Kuntze
Description:
Orchid, the bulb is very small 5-6 mm. 1 leaf. The inflorescence is 15-25 cm long, flowers grow close together, to 3-4 mm, blooming in early winter.
Distribution: Found in the Chinese Himalayas, eastern Himalayas, Assam, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. In VietNam, found in Gia Lai, Kon Tum, Đà Lạt, Lâm Đồng. 
Ecological: On trees or rocks at elevations about 2000 m.
Reference: 
- theplantlist.org
- efloras.org
- orchidspecies.com
- ipni.org
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